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later, what kind of policing do you call this? a new human rights report says too many of india's place are abusive and failing at their job. a hollywood actress takes send moo on the road. >> cinema is for everybody and everywhere. we are knowing how few opportunities there are for people to realize how incredibly wise cinema is. >> hello. a secretive come nist state with nuclear ambitions which has been playing fast and loose with the rest of the world. today they have been playing host to bill clinton, the most senior visitor in a decade. he met north korean leader, kim jong-il and secured a pardon for the journalists arrested. we have this report from washington. >> bill clinton arrived in north korea in an unmarked jet. he carried with him the hopes of american diplomacy in a very dangerous corner of the world. mr. clinton met kim jong-il, north korea's mysterious leader. it is an extraordinary noment. there hasn't been a visit to pyongyang by such a high profile american in years. >> this obviously is a very sensitive topic. we will hope to provide some more detail at a later poin
the same everywhere, do aly everywhere, very rapidly, i mentioned egypt is growing, china is growing, india is growing, india is an interesting case as well. win india became independent in 1490 -- 48, in 48, india chose the economic model which was extremely popular at that time, closed border state controlling the industry, you couldn't start a new business, even a small business without the state authorization, and this was supposed to bring india out of poverty. between 1991, was 1%. this was so predictable, so constant, so regular, that economists in india called that the into rate of growth, as if 1% was rted in the indian or hindu culture. in 1991, the finance minister decided to open the border to welcome foreign investments to a certain extent, to the license system, and india is growing 5%, 6%, 7% according to the year. i mentioned in the a because it is less known, what happened in china, i will not elaborate. one of the miracles which is not a miracle,ust an application of sound principle and good economic policy, shows that the cost share, religion, civilization is not a key fa
>>> tonight on "worldfocus" -- >> in india, swine flu has triggered a wave of panic with schools, theaters and shopping malls shutting down. tonight we investigate the health threat there and elsewhere. is the flu fear justified? >>> glimmer of hope. surprising numbers show germany and france have pulled out of recession. could the rest of europe be far behind? and what does that mean for the u.s. economy? >>> as secretary of state clinton meets with the first woman president of liberia, we look at the women's movement in that west african country. a force so strong, it drove a dictator from power. >>> and we continue our look at the impact of climate change on remote lands. traveling to cambodia to meet the monks out to save a forest one tree at a time. >>> good evening, i'm martin savidge. we are going to start here tonight with a subject that has a lot of people here and throughout the world increasingly concerned as we heard towards fall that. subject is the h1n1 swine flu virus, which according to the world health organization has killed just under 1,500 people worldwide. ri
>>> tonight "worldfocus" -- >> in india, swine flu has triggered aave ofpanic with schools, theaters an shopping is the flu fear justified? >>> glimmerof hope. surprisingumbers show germany and france have pulled out of recession. coulthe rest of europe be far behind? and what does that mean for the u.s. economy? >>>as secretary of state clinton meets with the first woman presidt of liberia,we ok at the womes movement in thatest african country. a force so strong, it drove a dictator fm power. >>> and we cntinue our look at the impact of climate change on mote lands. traveling to cambodia toeet the monks out to save a forest one treet a time. >>> good ening, i'm marti savidge. we are going to starhere night with a subject that ha a lot of people re and throughout the world increasingly concern aswe ard towards fall that. subject is the h1n1 swine f virus, which according to the world health oanization has kied just under 1,500 people worldwide. rit now it's spreading through india th its vast and densely packedopulation, to use the words of "the new york tes." it has been c
's elections. what do india and china think? massive rescue efforts in taiwan, hundreds are still unaccounted for. clinton in africa and the perils of being one half of the world's most influential couple. >> you want me to tell you what my husband thinks? >> also in this hour, a new colonialism, or just common sense. a special report on liberia. come back cooled off, michael shoemaker is forced out of a formula one return. this is 7:00 a.m. in washington, mid day here in london, half past 7:00 in the evening rangoon. the pro-democracy leader there has been found guilty of violating her house arrest. she was sentenced to an additional 18 months confinement. the sentence has drawn condemnation from europe. there is the word from india and china. she was convicted of allowing an american man to stay there after he swam there uninvited. >> please insure that nothing would except -- disrupt the trial of the most famous war and -- famous woman in burma. she is a symbol of democracy. her supporters had hoped that she would be freed. a guilty verdict means that she is going back to house arrest for
be off the on markets like india in particularly actually. >> mark, this is christine again. one story we're focusing on, china's wealth fund, cic to buy u.s. mortgages. what does it say about the chinese appetite for u.s. trishes, and is this an ideal investment for the chinese? >> gee, i didn't see that news headline. i would say $2 billion isn't a lot of money for china. it's a lot of money for the rest of us but not for china. the chinese have been very explicit they want to take advantage of the weak prices globally to make acquisitions. they've been trying to make acquisitions in resources around the world. i don't read anything huge into it. sorry, christine, not one way or the other. >> thanks for joining and sharing your thoughts with us. mark matthews and aaron snipe. >>> banker bonuses under attack from all sides in the u.k. chancellor alstair darling told the sunday times he will change the law to ensure compensation is not paid to employees whose actions put banks at risks. the comments come with reports from bar clays is offering a massive package for several employees being
this morning, i'm guessing. >>> people in india are getting the keys to the cheapest car in the world. how i remember this. what does it mean for the u.s. auto industry. clark howard breaks down how the new car might help your wallet in the future. >> the nano car, the world's cheapest automobile is now in people's driveways in india. this car you can buy in india for $2500. that's right a full four-door car seats four people you like a fifth you don't, is now available and selling like crazy. you may wonder, why am i telling you about a car that's only available in india? big news, this car just passed the european union safety and crash test, a car somewhat similar to ours and europeans are already buzzing they're going to be able to buy a car, even with the modifications for european will end up being somewhere around $3500. what about us? i want you to know, for us, this is a clear trend that we are going to see, in the next few years, cars cheaper than you ever imagined, about the price of a motorcycle. i'm clark howard. for more ways to save, go to cnn do cn cnn.come/clarkhoward. >> cl
looking at 8% this year. >> this year. so maybe up to 9, maybe -- >> well,. >> and india is doing the same, do you think or is that -- >> i don't know. mi far less familiar with what is going on. but i think having had the election in india which the first time has given them a pretty strong mandate in the government, i think they will be able to move ahead much more easily than in the past where there have been so many political factions fighting to try and be on top of things. so i think india has the ability now to get into much stronger position than it was in beforehand. >> most people look at india and china as leading the economic recovery. and perhaps brazil coming in and then the united states and they see europe lagging. >> well, i would agree with you about this. china, india, brazil. i think they are already showing it. they are already goinging that far. 9 united states knew far better than i how things are going. but you still see both in the united states and in europe news of job layoffs and although the financial sector seems to be in less bad shape, let's put it that way,
blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart who i keep fully informed in india. >> ok. going to open it up. [unaudible question] >> i'm not going to stand so i don't block the cameras. >> please identify yourself. >> martha raddatz from abc news. ambassador holebook i know you want to talk about the civilian side of this. >> but you don't? >> but the security is so intergind. tell me how that is affecting what you're trying to do, what kind of a hindrance that is, what hads to happen in order for you to succeed and as part of that i want to sigh that a lot of people i talk to, civilians in afghanistan complain that they really can't go outside the wire in certain areas because of the security. >> you mean the americans? >> yes. >> le
,. >> and indias doing the same, do youhink or is that -- >> ion't know. mi far les familiar with what is going on but i think havi had the election inndiahich the first time has giv them a pretty strg mandate in the governmenti think they will be able to move ahe much me easily than in the past wre there have been so many political factions fighting to try and be on top of thing so i think india hashe ability noto get into much stronger position than it was in befehand. >> most people look at india and china as leading the economicecovery. and perhaps brazil coming i and then the united states and they see eure lagging. >> well, i wouldgree with yoabout this. ina, india, bzil. i thi they are already showing it. they a already goinging that far. 9 united states knew far better than i h things are ing. but you still see bo in the united stas and europe news of j layoffs andlthough theinancial sector seems to be in less bad shape, let's put it that way, the realconomy, one hopes against hope that things a going to look better. but you still kee reading about job layoffs. and until that allyurns,
's left hundreds dead. >>> plus, anger boiling over in india right now at the way one of the country's biggest stars was treated by u.s. immigration officials we're learning new details right now of the incident that's grown to a real international controversy. i'm wolf blitzer in cnn's commander for breaking news, politics, and extraordinary reports from around the world. you're in "the situation room." >>> he's been focusing like a laser beam on health care reform, but for a brief time today, president obama put america's servicemen and women front and center speaking at the convention in phoenix and vowing more money and help for vets struggling to deal with life after combat. let's go to our senior white house correspondent, ed henry. what was the president's basic message to the vets? >> reporter: urging more patience in afghanistan, a war that has been going almost eight years, the president telling me that the fighting is fierce, that the u.s. will not defeat the tlaliban overnight. out here on the streets of the convention center, some of the groups that used to stalk preside
this year. dell hopes china and india will drive revenue growth next year. it looks like we are up big on those earnings reports. good news there. dell enjoying nearly 8.5% higher. hank greenberg tells cnbc that there's no truth that he's leading a grew buyback for aig. aig rose 26% on tuesday on reports of reaching out to determine how to run the company. well, you can get more news, videos and blogs online at cnbc.com. ross. >> still to come on today's program, as well, deflation unemployment hit record highs in japan. we'll assess the likelihood of the land slide victory and what it means to investors. the u.s. economy that long 1% in the second quarter, unchanged from our initial estimates. from post party sickness syndrome? there's a revolutionary cure. it's called cascade all-in-one actionpacs. and it's like adding the ultimate button to your dishwasher. because it has the power to pre-wash... dissolve... and rinse the whole mess away. so in the morning your dishes will feel like new again. and so will you. cascade complete all-in-one actionpacs. >>> okay. we've got the global up
. wouldn't that be nice. >>> okay. people in india are getting the keys to the cheapest car in the world, but what does it mean for the u.s. ando industry? hln money expert clark howard breaks down how the new car might help your wallet in the future. >> the nano car, the world's cheapest automobile, is now in people's drivesways in india. this car that you can buy in india for $2,500, that's right, a full four-door car seats four people, if you like a fifth you don't, it's now available and selling like crazy and be may wonder why am i telling but a car only available in india? well, big news. this car just passed the european union safety and crash test which are somewhat similar to ours, and europeans are already buzzing that they are going to be able to buy a car that even with the modifications for europe will end up being somewhere around $3,500. what about us? well, i want you to know for us this is a clear trend we are going to see in the next few years, cars cheaper than you ever imagined, about the price of a motorcycle. i am clark howard. for more ways to save, go to cnn.com/c
of the europeans and particularly in conquered india, as the prime concern. we can easily think of m blocks today. hits observation in fact is one of the few solid and enduring principles of international and domestic affairs. well to keep in mind. at the food crisis is a case in point. it erupted first and most dramatically in haiti in the early 2008, and like bangladesh, haiti is a symbol of the utter misery. like bangladesh, when the european explorers arrived, they said they were stunned because it was so remarkably rich in resources. later it became the source of much of france's wealth. i am not going to run through this sordid history but the current food crisis traces back directly to woodrow wilson's invasion of haiti, which was murderous and brutal and destructive. among wilson's many crimes was to dissolve the haitian parliament at gunpoint, because if refused to pass what was called progressive legislation which would allow u.s. businesses to take over haitian lance. wilson marines then ran a free election in which the legislation was passed by 99.9% of the vote. that is of the 5% of
in india, as well. india will be an economy we will take far greater notice of as the years go by. i agree totally in the decoupling. we are continuing to see that shift in economic power from west to east. we have too just to it. you have to adjust to it. far more severely than we do. it isn't something that is going to go away. but it cannot done and we will do it. but whether it will be deflationary or not, i'm not quite sure. >> meanwhile, howard, if i can just change tax slide, a large part of the rally in europe has been from financials. but we heard from rbs today who added realism. >> yes, they did. it has been an amazing week. yes, we were very glad the it's all over. what a week for banks. the good, the bad and the ugly. well, if the ugly is royal bank of scotland today, then we can actually live through it. but you know, the bottom line is that there's still a massive write-off here. banks are not performing in the way, the manner which they need to. there's a lot of clearing of decks to do and there's a lot of change of strategy still to come. but well done to those like hsbc a
china is about 30%. if you look at 40 years down the line, china and india will be above that. so you have an enormous structure taking place and, therefore, a strong engine of growth. clearly, if the u.s. consumer was going to collapse again, i don't think the chinese, indian, brazilian consumer would be able to compensate. but if we have a stabilization, as i believe we will have in the western economies, i think that the marginal call is going to be on the emerging economies and i think that's the engine of growth. >> manford, what do you think? to believe what virginie said makes you think asia can decouple with what's going on in the rest of the world. >> i have to agree with her to a larger extent. the asian consumer is becoming more important. but the absolute numbers don't show it. it shows an increasingly large consumer. but we need the situation where the u.s. consumer does recover to at least a moderate extent. i don't think complete decoupling is a possibility. >> mamprett gill, thank you, thank you, virginie, as well. >> thank you. >>> west lb is refusing to comment on su
of india, july imports 68% year over year. exxon mobile and petro china, $41 billion deal for gorgon project in australia. but that is making major news in the gas complex today. mark, back to you. >> a rally in asia overnight. let's check out some numbers. shanghai composite, jumping 1.4% a day after suffering its biggest loss of the year. bombay sensex up 7%. what's going on in europe, guy? >> we are in positive territory at the moment, but as you can see the cac is off. barely in positive territory. the story remains very, very cautious. volatility is down fractionally but nonetheless looking at a very, very nervous market. let me show because we've done today. the housing data did have a big impact on the markets, dragging us down and stoxx 600 is up by 0.5% at the moment. let me talk about the data points out today. uk inflation is very, very stick y it's still positive, one of the on the advanced economies that still have economy at 1.8. you strip out mortgages that number goes negative. the survey out of europe very positive as well. making pointing to a positive g3 for the ge
. if we do the decent thing, the nuclear arsenal will be hard. greta: and do what? india is next door. they hate each other. what can we do? >> the military is called the steel skeleton because it is the one institution that holds the country together. we need to make sure does not turn against us. it is not anything we can do in a few days or few months. if we lose the struggle and the radicals takeover, they have dozens or hundreds of nuclear weapons to use against india. the stakes in pakistan are very high, higher than afghanistan or iraq. greta: we hear the nuclear arsenal is safe and under control. i do know why, but i do not feel comfortable with that. can the committee that is true? he was like the walmart and nuclear weapons. he was giving a clear weapons all over the world to north korea, syria. he is a hero in number three. the worst thing they did was give him a house arrest. >> >> i dealt with that when those in the government. from a technical point of view, it is unlikely you will have an accidental detonation of nuclear weapons. greta: i'm not worried about that. >> th
we do? i know the nuclear arsenal is terrifying, and you've got india next door and they hate each other, but what can we do? >> well, i think in pakistan, the military, which the people there are called the steel skelton, because it's the one institution of government that really holds the country together. we have to make sure that does not turn against us. that's not going to be anything we can do in a few days or a few months. it's a long-term proposition. if we lose that struggle, though, and the radicals take over in pakistan, they've got dozens, maybe hundreds of nuclear weapons to use against india or to give the terrorist groups that can be used around the world. the stakes are very high around the world, i think today higher than afghanistan or iraq. >> can you -- i mean, we hear from our government that the nuclear arsenal is safe, that it's under control. i don't know why, but i don't feel comfortable with that. can you convince me that that's true? i know that even a.q. khan, is almost like the devil, like the wal-mart of nuclear weapons. he's giving nuclear weapons al
. on his visit to india in 2006, david cameron said he believed it was time for britain and india to forge a new special relationship, focusing particularly on fighting terrorism, protecting the environment, and globalization. india is also leading member of the commonwealth, an organization which has been neglected and undervalued under the labour government in britain. in last year's strategy documents, the only mention of the commonwealth was in the title. it is extraordinary -- it is the unique network of 53 country spanning five continents with 35 of the world's population -- 3 favre% of the world's population. -- 35% of the world's population. a good example of how it could be used is to encourage to take a leading role in addressing state failure, like coordinating a future rehabilitation package for its former member, zimbabwe. if the commonwealth is not the only group of countries where rican recreate historic connections on a new, modern basis. i have long argued that britain should embark on the elevation of its links with many of the countries of the middle east and gulf, not o
talking you with you. thank you very much. let's head out to india right now. mumbai for the latest on the india bit report. ayesha faridi joins us. hello, eayesha. >> thanks for that, christine. after a very tough day, more action seen for the broader market. while the sensex is a shade odd in the green, the crucial point, i think, is that is standing above that 4,700 mark. and it's the broader markets which have seen more. meantime, of course, a lot of things are really playing up. banking is one such bank. this led to the kind of recovery that we have seen today. so a couple of these counters and not just the heavyweight counters, development credit bank amongst the midcap banks had been showing you gains of about 5 odd percent. you've got axis bank is holding up by about 1.5%. icici bank, over a 3% move. l&t is doing out quite well. in the meantime, we have got a couple of news reports, still unconfirmed, that india plans to sue the euro union at the world trade organization at the wto for allowing big pharmaceutical companies to detain engine nettic drugs in transit to developi
billiton, marius kloppers. that's at 8:40 eastern. let's turn now to india. ayesha faridi joins us live from mumbai from the india business report. ayesha. >> thanks for that, christine. it's a bad wednesday for the indian economic markets. it's sliced through 4,600, 4,500 and has even broken the 4,400 market in trade today. it's recovered from the low point of the day. just about half an hour can ba, we were seeing 2% cuts for the sensex and the nifty. the bodder markets reeling under pressure there, as well. in fact, most technical analysts do believe that 43.50 thereabouts is now the next resistance thorn for the market. the big losers in trade are the entire technologies space. you've got realty which is facing a lot of pressure in trade today. so these are the two weak pockets. besides that, a whole hoeft of these heavyweight counters have also been weak. but economic data has been very positive. we have market expectations about 7.8% across the board growth, but currently, the market is more worried about the global weakness that we are seeing. with that, it's back to you. >> ayes
on india? we have the economy growing 6.1% in the june quarter. how sustainable is it once this sort of stimulus kind of wears off? >> well, it seems that, you know, all those countries that have been hit much harder than the u.s. itself, the u.s. was the epicenter of the crisis, but all the asia countries have been hit much harder and have fallen down further. so they rebound also in a stronger fashion. i think this is just a rebound of, you know, looking like more recovery potential. but i think, you know, as the u.s. is also picking up speed now in the third quarter. we should be quite a sustainable recovery across asia. >> yeah. we also have in japan, of course, a new government in place. we also have mixed data coming out, japan today. we have industrial output better than expected growing 1.9% in july, but retail sales also falling in july, as well. how do you think all of this is going to weigh on the bank of japan? >> well, we think that the bank of japan is going to keep the monetary policy for a considerable period of time. but certainly what we are now seeing is at least i
choir talking to us live from long congress. >>> from talking about china, let's talk about india. ayesha faridi joins us live from india for the indian bit report. >> thanks for that, christine. the markets have picked up. 4,500 is back for the nifty. similar is the case for the sensex, as well. so you do have those pockets which actually give up their gains in yesterday's trade. for example, the entire auto basket is holing up strongly. tata motors is notching a 6.5% gain and you have the entire sugar pack on the kind of prices forming up. the entire sugar sector is picking up very, very much. we are picking up reports that the government has indeed chosen strife arkalap to be the generic formulation of tamiflu. they haven't got an official word from the government in terms of the kind of orders that they may actually bag and what sort of price appreciation or rather margin bump up it may lead to, but the stock itself is holding up very, very strongly in trade. meantime, 161 strains have been confirmed. with that, it's back to you. >> ayesha, thank you very much. in asia, yanzhou coal has agre
figures. outlook for the emerging markets, especially for india, that was very reassuring to investors. but holcim says it doesn't see a recovery before next year. are a part from that, we're watching ubs after the swiss government says said it will sell its ruffle 9% stake in the market until august. that will probably be somewhere around 70 so it will leave the swiss government with a nice profit here. overall, analysts are a bit more bullish especially that we heard the u.s. sacks has been signed yesterday and two major obstacles for ubs are out of the way. before i let you go, let me mention the swiss access data, we saw a drop of 27% from july so a small improvement compared to june when we saw a drop of 28%. that is it from zurich. >> thank you very much, carolin. the volumes are very low today. the french mngt is bouncing back after a flat session yesterday. total, the largest french oil producer, is up 2.3%. oil services, they are doing well on the back of increasing oil prices yesterday. also in good shape today, almost % higher, the dugmaker is boosted by a decision in the u.
unnecessary. on top of that, the huge expansion of economy such as china and india means that in our working lifetimes, the size of the european economy relative to address the world looks set to shrink dramatically. projections have shown europe's share of the world economy declining from 18% to 10% by the middle of the century, and even the united states is not immune from the effect of economic problems. this diminished economic weight will have a major impact on the ability of western nations to achieve their foreign policy goals. we are used to the idea of calling for economic sanctions against nations whose human rights records we find an acceptable. south africa under apartheid being a celebrated example. now we apply them to recalcitrant and regimes. it is already clear that the power of such economic weapons is declining. it follows from this analysis that it will decline much further in the years to come. what is more, much of the economic weight in the world is passing the countries which either do not fully share our concepts of democracy and human rights or for their own reasons
to pass a resolution in the u.n. council on human-rights. india, another rising power and the world's most populous democracy, is traditionally not inclined to support our western inclination to support human rights and economic pressure and military intervention. nor are many of the growing economic power centers in the world, brazil or in the call. not only has the world not converting around our own democratic norms, but according to a survey, global freedom to his third year of decline in 2008, but nearly powerful democratic nations do not share our view of how to conduct foreign policy. the liberal interventionism has generated much debate in britain. but the varying degrees, all have subscribed to it. the economic conditions have enjoyed some support as has military intervention in many countries. iraq being a much more controversial case, but heavily supported at the time. we're all agreed that we would try to intervene in another situation. but in the years and decades to come, the rise of other nations will constrain our ability to act in this way. a further constraint will come i
india. we learned from democrat senator claire mccaskill that, quote, if we go too far with this, that is cap and trade, then all we are going to do is chase more jobs to china and india where they've been putting up coal-fired plants every 10 minutes. in sum, we have a slew of hearings in three unsuccessful votes on the senate floor. actually i'd say four because we rejected the kyoto treaty in the beginning. the democrats taught us that cap and trade is a great big tax and will raise electricity prices on consumers i would have to say in a regressive way, send jobs to china and india all without any impact on global temperature, so off we go into the august recess secure in the knowledge that cap and trade is riddled with flaws and that democrats are seriously divided over one of president obama's top domestic policy priorities. and we also know that according to a recent polling the american public is increasingly unwilling to pay anything, as the polling has shown, to fight global warming. but all this does not mean cap and trade is dead and gone. it's very much alive as demo
are getting word that a 7.6 magnitude earthquake has struck near india's island. this is being felt in a number of countries. we're hearing even tokyo was shaken because of this. it's also called a tsunami watch and that watch covers india, myanmar, thailand, indonesia, bangladesh, as well. so, it could cause quite a bit of damage. we have a tsunami watch for all of those countries. it was a large magnitude quake, a 7.6 magnitude quake near india's island, but it's being felt in a number of countries including right in tokyo. they felt the aftershocks of it. >> wow. betty, there's some other news you're following right now, as well, right? >> absolutely. we want to talk gas prices making a steady upward climb. take a look at this. it's risen every day since july 21st when the national average price per gallon was $2.46. well, today it is up to $2.65, up 19 cents in just 20 days. analysts expect the price to peak as high as $2.70 a gallon, still well below last summer's record high prices. >>> and a wave of deadly bombings in iraq mass left at least 48 people dead and more than 400 i
-- the manufacturing jobs that were in america and were moved to countries like india and china. i think that they are experiencing an industrial revolution much like what we saw in the 20th-century. i think that they are developing a middle-class while we are losing our middleclass. i also think that for an economy to do well, there has to be a strong middle-class. that is indicative when you look at consumer spending indexes. we just don't have the money. we don't have the dollars because we don't have manufacturing jobs that developed are middle-class. guest: that is exactly right. that is the essence of the book, which is that china and india have replicated the success in developing this industrialized economy. by opening of their labor force to more exploitation, it does speak to the myth of gdp. you have a growth but poverty grows at the same time. the loss of manufacturing jobs is really such a central element to both this recession and the declining living standards in terms of the exploitation of people, but declining marriage rates, unraveling of our society and many other cou
of inflation especially in areas such as india and china, if we start to see areas there, we'll see commodities sustained. i am against ru bin on this particular point.t. i think we will see a stronger move ahead. it's more inflation led. the cost of money being so low at the moment that's driving that price. if we start to see a tightening, then the commodity rally westbound able to be sustained. >> martin, always a pleasure speaking to you. xw >>> shares in barclays trading higher after a profit jumped 8% in the first half to just under $5 billion. the numbers were shy of forecast after impairment charges on corporate and consumer loans jumped 86%. the profit of the group's investment dropped from a year ago thanks to the acquisition of lehman brothers and commodity revenu revenues. speaking first, the president bob diamond, said the bank is getting conservative. >> it's getting easier and easier to see exactly how it's going to play out. we are expecting a difficult second half in the year in terms of provisioning. that's part of our plan. >> in china, more signs that the government is putti
for joining us. let's head over to india and join ayesha faridi live for the india business report. >> thanks for that, christine. standing or staring at that 1.5% gain for both the sensex and the nifty. might i add, it has come off from the top of the day. we're almost staring at a 100 point rally for the nifty just about a while ago. technology has been weak in trade today. watch out for counters. unitech amongst the real estate space, it's almost a tug of war space. reliance industries, which has an extremely high weighted in the index, that counter is flattened. but the rest of the market is looking good. telecom is definitely in focus. reliance communications now, we are expecting up from our sources that reliance communications is in talk for source based information up now. but that counter is holding up. more update coming in part and mtn, the deal is currently on and our sources indicate that the board will be meeting today. if it is conclusive, we can expect some agreement from the deal in the next ten days. the going has been good for that one. the metals space and the real estate
this market. and the sensex in india, only market trading on the up side right now, up 0.3%. overall, a weak picture here in terms of crude oil and nymex crude. down 21 cents. concerns about global demand weighing on this, nymex, $71.22 a barrel. brent is falling, as well, down 30 cents, $71.35 a barrel. mike, good to see you. how are the futures looking today? >> good afternoon, christine. good to see you, as well. and the futures at this point are looking like the dow is going to shoot for straight eight with seven consecutive days tying its longest win streak of the year. it looks like we could have a mixed open at least in about 5 1/2 hours time from now. moving on to the treasury market on the back of another relatively successful auction yesterday of two year notes and ahead of another auction today of seven year notes, we do see the bund yield creeping up at 3723%. yesterday, the price went up just a little bit on the benchmark ten year t-note and the yield came down and that trend is continuing, although it's basically unchanged with yesterday's close right now at 3.43%. and then mov
visit to india in 2006, david cameron said that he believed it was time for britain and india to forge a new special relationship, focusing particularly on fighting terrorism, protecting the environment, and globalization. india is also a leading member of the commonwealth, which has been valued on to the labour -- which as been devalued in the labour gouvernment. it is extraordinary diversity offers some straight, a unique network of 53 countries spanning five continents with 30% of the world's population. we believe the commonwealth is a tool to be picked up and used more often, to help dialogue and conflict prevention, taking a leading role in addressing state failure by coordinating up future rehabilitation package for its former member, zimbabwe. get the commonwealth is not the only group of countries where we can recreate historic connections on a new modern basis. i have long argued that britain should embark on the elevation of its links with many countries of the middle east in the gulf. not only diplomatically, but in matters of culture, education, commerce, and security. thi
. we will start right on time. the ambassador from india is here. [laughter] [applause] but councilman jack evans is here. [applause] we have representatives from different embassies, as well. let me begin this morning by introducing our special guest, dr. christina romer. as many of you may know, she is the chair of the council of economic advisers. that position was established by the employment act of 1946 where it was decided that the president of united states needed independent, objective economic analysis and advice. from the time that the council was greeted the late 40's, it has had some of the most distinguished economists serving in that position. it has had a long history of very distinguished economists and dr. romer is within the tradition. she is what the best known economists in the country and one of the best known macro economist in the country. she served for 20 years as a member of the faculty of the university of california, berkeley. in that position, she became an expert on the depression, the causes and consequences, and how the u.s. government responded. she ca
's basically the only computer people are going to have in emerging markets. in india a government regulator just put out a report, four times as many people getting on the web on their phones as on their pc. >> what about that? do you buy into some of these trends or are you just literally looking very specifically at dividend plays and value plays? >> well, one of the things that we've seen is the u.s. consumer and consumer around the world is actually continuing to buy stuff, which is great. you would think that with the challenges the consumer has faced over the last year or so in deleveraging and everything else and the job market the way it is the consumers wouldn't be spending. but one of the things that we're hopeful about with the economy is that the consumer's actually out there spending money. >> well, what about the market here? you're talking about a market that's up 50% from the bottom on march 9th or so. >> we think right now we're pretty much as close to a maximum value point for the moment. when third quarter earnings come out, we expect them to be pleasing enough that the m
countries, brazil, india, russiaa, china. russia is still one of the ones you want to be invested? i recognize as oil goes higher it's positive but russia was sort of the outlier there for a little while. >> i'd say we're most focused, you know, at morgan stanley investment management we have an investment emerging markets portfolio manager rushi sharma. i agree with him. we very much like the india story. i'm probably a little more positive on brazil. but we want to stay in the big liquid countries. and we also have a positive bias toward some of the smaller countries where we're seeing catch-up, things like turkey. but there's a lot of interesting things going on in the u.s. versus global. take china versus the u.s. right now. china's financials are trading at almost three times book. the u.s. financials are trading at one times book. and in the near term i think the chinese banks will continue to do well, but ultimately they're going to participate price the way u.s. banks did from excessive lending along the way. there's going to be opportunity we do long, we do long short, and t
of its relationship with india, and most of all feels that this constructive engagement is likely to end, once pakistan ceases to be of strategic use to america. all political groups here asked the u.s. to use soft power and economic growth to resolve the intractable conflict that continues to spread through this region. anita mcnaught, al jazeera in islamabad. >> if you want to get a sense what american diplomats working in pakistan are sometimes up against, consider this account we came across earlier this week in "the new york times." it describes a recent meeting between the obama administration's new under secretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs, that's judith mchale, and a pakistani journalist. according to the "times," she told him how america wants to build bridges to the muslim world. his response, quoting now, "you should know that we hate all americans. from the bottom of our souls, we hate you." >>> and now to our weekly roundtable. our look back at some of the week's most important international news stories. tonight we'll discuss the presidential election
, suspicious of its relatiship wi india, and most of all feels thathis constructive engagement is likelyo end, once pakistan cees to be of strategic use to america all political groups he asked the u.s. to use soft per and onomic growth to resolve the intractable confct that contues to spread through this region. anitmcnaught, al jazeera in islamabad, paktan. >> if yowant to get a sense what american diplomats woing in pakistaare sometimes up agnst, consider this account we came across earlier ts week in "the new yo times." it desibes a recent meeting between the obama adnistration's new under secretary of state forublic diplomy and public affairs, that's judith mchale, and a pakistani journali. accoing to the "times," she told him howmerica wants to ild bridges to the muslim world. his response, quotin should know that we hate a amerans. from the bottom of o souls, we te you." >>> and now to o weekly roundtab. our look back at some of t week's mosimportant international newstories. tonight 'll discuss. the esidential election in afghanisn. can it be considered success? what comes next? the o
for that report. >> in india, ayesha faridi joins us live for the india business report. >> we participated in the global rally today. yesterday it clocked a new high for ourselves and the nifty clocked that or cruised past that 4,700 mark. today, the markets chose to consolidate. the biggest drav dragger is oil and gas heavyweight, which is why you're seeing the nifty break away and increase those values. tata motors is your biggest gainer for today, at almost 6.5% gains. there are also rumors in the market that they may get the loan guarantee approved for the government for bridge loan acquisition of land rover. besides that, most of the commodity stocks have been doing very well. you've got auto ancillary stocks looking very well. the monthly sales numbers that came out for auto stocks and infillry stocks are picking up in trade amid the mid and the small caps are holding up, as well. >>> elsewhere, we are looking at euro's biggest bank, hsbc, the company could soon be one of the first foreign companies to list in shanghai. reuters says it could raise up to $7.3 billion in a shanghai ipo
for the future. >> jean-marc boursier, thank you. thank you. >> in line with the rest of asia today, india is trading higher. we're joined now by ayesha faridi. thanks for that, maura. tale, it's been quite a choppy day. while it has struggled or tried not to hit the 4700 mark for the nifty, it isn't really being able to do that. it has made many attempts now for the trading session. all indices are in the green, but a big winner, indeed, or trade is indeed in force and the entire i.t. pack. clst is a brokerage which has been bearish on the entire i.t. space in india and is upgraded and it has upped the price target, as well. and they do also believe that they may beat fy '10 guidance and that is bringing volatility to the space, including in the midcap space. another stock in focus is united which is down by almost 2% in trade today. here is the news why. they have now called off stocks for diaggio sizing high evaluations and anti-trust issues as to why it was called off. it's a sentiment and a dampener with knee jerk reactions coming into it there. meantime, of course, we have a couple o
consumer is currently equal to the total economy of china plus india, doubled. so when governments around the world are spend ag lot of money, they will not be able to do that indefinitely. at some point, the american consumer has to get back into the market. so is he or she doing that? well, we don't really know yet. the housing data is good news, and actually, most recoveries begin with recovery of the housing markets followed by automobiles, appliances and then other consumer categories. but many experts argue that this is not an ordinary recession and will not be an ordinary recovery. the consumer went deep into debt over the last ten years, is slowly paying that off and won't get easy credit any time soon. the optimists point out, on the other hand, that the american savings rate is already back up to 7%, which is close to its 30-year average. the pessimists say yes, but americans are going to be very cautious now and save more in the face of the uncertainty and hard times they foresee. so, the key to understanding whether and when we will experience a real economic recovery around t
and i have trouble bringing in my workers from india or pakistan or singapore or britain? would it be a lot easier for me to move the job to the worker overseas and bring the workers to the job here? >> i had a conversation about three weeks ago with a google executive who is responsible for these decisions, director of global hiring. he says we hire and we locate our facilities wherever we can bring in the till to people we need. he said that at this point they think they basically interviewed everyone in the state of california. google searches the entire country and the entire world to find the best people and he said because it's hard to get the people in the u.s., we will locate in hong kong or singapore or europe and we're seeing microsoft for the first and has moved a research and development facility outside into vancouver because it's easier for them to get the people that want in canada. that is what companies will do. they can get them here they will go elsewhere. >> jackie, does it make sense to say that the mexican people are the ones that suffered the most of 9/11?
people injured. the first earthquake was a magnitude 7.6 in indian ocean near india's andaman islands. the second quake was a 6.5 magnitude near tokyo. tsunami warnings issued but later taken back. >>> the same state senator called for sanford to resign after having an affair and now this republican calls for sanford to resign after book in first class flights to european. and he says they are wrong. >>> police are looking for man holding a gown a woman's head during a bank robbery. it shows the man pointing a gun toward a teller and threatens to take a customer hostage. the woman was able to get away but the suspect did take some money. >>> talk about somehow getting lost in translation. secretary state hillary clinton got angry during a q&a session with congolese university student. the student speaking in french asked what president obama would think about chinese financial contracts with congo. but the translator apparently made a mistake and asked secretary clinton what mr. clinton would think. that didn't go over very well. >> you want me to tell you what my husband thinks? my h
seng fell 2 1/2%. shanghai composite down 2.9%. india's bombay sensex is down. guy? >> narc, the get go of the session, we were in negative territory. you follow what happened in asia. payroll has changed that all around. you are seeing the futures numbers. you can see it as we speak acro across europe. we've now got most of the main markets trading in positive territory. let me show you the spike we got in the stoxx 600. this is the story, instantaneous reaction to that number. stoxx 600 is trading at a session high here in europe. we are up by 1%. as you can see, most of the morning spent in negative territory. let me talk about some of the stories that aren't moving the market over on our side of the pond. royal bank, very negative today. much more negative than anticipated. it missed on the metrics today with its figures. the real thing that struck the market, though, was the comments that came out of steven, the ceo. i spoke with him first thing this morning. he was much more cautious than lloyd was earlier on this week. he is talking about two years at least in terms of getting th
considering countries in the region like pakistan or india or russia or china? >> the commander -- this is a commander's review of his area of responsibility, which is limited to afghanistan. that is what this assessment is on. it is an assessment of the situation on the ground as general mcchrystal and his team see it. >> we're looking at additional more troops -- >> i am laughing at the hammering and drilling. >> president karzai was saying they might need additional resources. >> if it is determined by the commander that he needs additional resources to complete his mission, that request will be made to the normal chain of command. it will go up through cencom, be validated along the way, and the secretary will make a determination whether or not he recommends to the president additional troops. . . . ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ >> is a secretary in touch with countries like india for additional resources? >> i don't know of any communication with india. if he is satisfied with the progress, and i don't think anybody is satisfied with progress, i think wh
, one hears that the russians have been selling more advanced weapons to india, they have also sold some advanced weapons to malaysia and i understand indonesia. they have, obviously, a deep oblem with japan because of the northern territories, but nevertheless, if the rusans were to see their relationship with china as in some respects inhibited, aren't the assets avaible to the russians to, if you like, increase their livery somewhat? >> well, the russians have been trying to exercise those. they understand that, and so, for example, the arms relationship was always something that implicitly if the tensions became worse, the russians could do what the united states did after tiananmen which was cut that off. but now the chise can develop a lot of this stuff indigenously, so that leverages decline. the oil and gas we discussed, it's something that russia's been trying to use to, say, threaten or not threaten but really just bargain off china and japan and other countries to get them to pay higher prices, and the chinese for a while, you know, pretty much stood on their terms. now the ru
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